Saward Abroad

"I shall always be haunted by thoughts of a sundrenched elsewhere." Isabelle Eberhardt

Tag: adventure

Pancakes in Amsterdam – Interrail Stop 1

Interrailing has almost become a rite of passage for young middle class Europeans. As far as travelling goes it’s a relatively cheap way of making your way around Europe and has the potential to be as free as you want it to be. No rushing to get prebooked flights or feeling like you’ve missed out by having to leave a city on a certain date. If you’re willing to take the risk of not getting a seat on your train, you can fill out the pass on the platform while you’re waiting for it to arrive. I met a lot of people this summer who were totally winging it, deciding on their next destinations dependant on recommendations from fellow travellers. I’m not that chilled out about travelling and so we’d made an itinerary before heading off. Our first stop would be Amsterdam. I’d been there before, on a day trip when I’d stayed in Rotterdam, and wanted to have a chance to explore this infamous city.

Sloterdjik Station

Sloterdjik Station

Neither my travel buddy nor I are massive partiers so we avoided the central hostels and stayed in a Meinenger (a hostel/hotel chain) in Sloterdjik. We got a decent discount as Interrailers and were right next to the local train station. From here it was less than 5 minutes to Centraal and the centre of Amsterdam. As you may have guessed by my previous posts, food is an essential part of travelling for me. So we jumped right in and tried Ossenworst which is ox sausage. It was a lot like salami but richer and meatier – sort of like salami and black pudding had a delicious baby.

Kicking things off

We kicked off our first day by doing a city tour with New Sandeman’s tour company. Our guide was Axel, who was actually from Amsterdam (something of a rarity with tour guides given that they’re usually travellers who never left). Before this started I had to try some Dutch pastry seeing as there’s so many different kinds. I tucked into an Appelflappen (apple flap: sweet pastry folded over and stuffed with apples and cinnamon, covered in sugar) as we headed off to lean about Amsterdam’s history. You don’t need me to tell you that it’s a beautiful city. The little streets, narrow houses and the famous canal network come together to make what you’d imagine from a European capital. I’m from Oxford, a famously medieval city full of old buildings and architecture. I honestly feel a little disorientated in newer cities. Rotterdam (which was almost entirely destroyed in WW2) made me feel like this. But I felt right at home in Amsterdam. Our tour guide was incredibly knowledgeable about the city, as you’d expect from a nature, while also having the worst Dad jokes I’d heard from someone his age.

more-canals

A personal favourite story that we learnt was about Napoleon’s annexation of the Netherlands. Before this, family names were not common in Holland, with Dutch people instead using patronymic names (ie a boy called Pieter whose father was called Jan would be Peiter Janszoon). Napoleon and his fancy French ways meant people had to register one family name and stick to it, passing this down to their children. The story goes that outraged by this the Dutch registered protest names that were rude or complete nonsense. Zondervan meaning ‘without surname’ is a favourite. Unfortunately when France lost control of Holland, turned out people thought this whole given name system was a good ‘un. And so some families were stuck with their protest names, even to this day. How true this is, I don’t know but it’s a great story.

We finished our tour in the neighbourhood of Jordaan where we had lunch at Café Sonneveld (Egelantiersgracht 72-74) as recommended by Axel. I had a traditional Dutch dish, stamppot with sausage. Stamppot is (like all good Northern European dishes) based on potatoes and is solid and warming. Not great food for the end of July but still delicious!

Bloemenmarkt and Pannenkoekenboot

The next morning my friend and I woke up early to head to Amsterdam’s Flower Market, the Bloemenmarkt. The friend I was travelling with is a biochemist whose special interest is plant genetics so he was in his element. There was a beautiful assortment of flowers in colour combinations I’d never seen before. Tulips were obviously a big feature but you could also buy all different kinds of bulbs and seeds. I think if we’d been at the end of our trip rather than the beginning our bags would have been full! You weren’t allowed to take photos of the actual flowers but there was a gorgeous selection of wooden tulips to choose from.

Wooden tulips at The Bloemenmarkt

Wooden tulips at The Bloemenmarkt

The Amsterdam Museum

The Amsterdam Museum

From here we wandered over to the Amsterdam Museum. We’d been meaning to go to the Rijksmuseum but we’d heard it was super crowded during the summer months. I’m really glad we went to the smaller one. It focused on the history of the city as a whole, tracing its origins as a small fishing village, through its history at the centre of a trading superpower, to the vibrant city it is today. The curation was excellent, leading you chronologically through Amsterdam’s timeline. Each room had a short video explaining the section of time that was the room’s focus. There was also a running side exhibition throughout the museum detailing the LGBT history of Amsterdam. I’d definitely recommend checking it out next time you’re in the city.

For me, however, the highlight of the trip was the Pannenkoekenboot. Yup, that’s right: the Pancake Boat. You pay €17 and get an hour and a half on a boat out in the port to eat as many pancakes as you can manage. They had three kinds: plain, apple and bacon. You could also ask for gluten free ones. Then there was a massive buffet full of toppings. We’re talking chocolate sprinkles, cheese, peaches, strawberries, a huge choice. I managed a respectable five. My father would have been proud.

Bacon and banana, a classic combination

Bacon and banana, a classic combination

That afternoon, full of pancakes, we headed into the Red Light District to explore. There’s a museum in a former brothel called Red Light Secrets that tells you a little about the history of prostitution in the city. It’s in an old narrow house and so can get a little crowded at busy times. But it’s an interesting set up and you learn a lot about the lives of the girls in Amsterdam’s famous windows. We also found a street with my name – a small victory for someone with an unusual spelling of ‘Bethanie’.

It's the little things

It’s the little things

We finished up the day with some beer tasting while the rain absolutely hammered it down outside. Our time in Amsterdam had come to an end. Coming back to a city I’d already been to proved to be a good choice. I felt I’d had more chance to explore and still had a lot left to discover. But regardless we were off to Berlin. And it was a whole different kind of adventure to get there.

No British stereotypes here

No British stereotypes here

 

Seoul: Gyeongbokgung and Gogigui

I headed out alone to visit Gyeongbokgung Palace, one of Seoul’s Five Grand Palaces. Gyeongbokgung was the first royal palace to be built by the Joseon Dynasty in 1395. It’s currently undergoing restoration after the Japanese occupation of Korea at the beginning of the 20th century when much of it was systematically destroyed. Until 1996 the Japanese Governor General Building stood on the site, having been built there during occupation in order to stop the Palace being a symbol of an independent Korea.

Walk up to palace

 

Before going anywhere in Seoul, check to make sure that it’s open as a lot of places are closed Monday or Tuesday – I guess this is so they can stay open over the weekend. Entering Gyeongbokgung Palace you go through a huge gate called Gwanghwamun. It’s a jarring experience, walking from the busy, crowded streets of Seoul, surrounded by skyscrapers through a gate and into a quiet, distinctly historical building complex. There were the traditional green and reds on the buildings, with gold detailing and huge sweeping curves to the roofs. Behind Gyeongbokgung is Bugaksan mountain, following the principle of baesanimsu (learn more about this in my Jeonju post).

I decided to take an English guided tour of the Palace, hoping to learn a little about the history of Gyeongbokgung rather than doing my usual wandering aimlessly and trying to translate Korean signposts. Our tour guide was an enthusiastic Korean woman and there was a relatively large group, mainly made up of Americans, a lot of whom had just moved to Seoul to start teaching English. They all seemed surprised that I’d come over for 10 days (admittedly I still can’t quite believe how far I went for such a short trip!). Gyeongbokgung was very similar to the shrine that I visited in Jeonju but on a much grander scale. The ongoing restoration project means that you can see up to 40% of the Palace complex as it was before Japanese occupation. It’s stunning, often said to be the grandest and most beautiful of the palaces within Seoul – I’ll get back to you on that when I do another trip to Korea! The gardens were incredibly peaceful, with my favourite spot being a little temple on an island in the middle of a lake. Korean Palaces are so unlike English castles and palaces. While we do have formal gardens, there’s nowhere near the same emphasis on outdoor spaces. Our climate isn’t exactly conducive to outdoor living!

Lily pond palace original

Gyeongbokgung Palace’s gardens

Gogigui

Korean BBQ

Every meal should look like this

After a day exploring Gyeongbokgung I headed back to Yongsan for another essentially Korean culinary experience: Korean barbecue (Gogigui in Korean). I’ve never had Korean barbeque before, despite it being one of the more popular foods that have made it over to the UK. If you’ve never had it, find the nearest place to you and go. Because there’s nothing more exciting than cooking your own food at your table. The place we went to was in the local market and was tiny, the kind of place that would be a super hipster pop-up joint if it was in London. Each table had a little coal pit that heated up a metal plate above, where you cooked the food. There was also a brass chimney that winched down over each hot plate to draw the smoke off. We were clearly not trusted to do it by ourselves as the woman who ran the place took one look at us and started cooking for us. One of my favourite things about meals in Korea is that you order your main dishes and then you automatically get kimchee and vegetables with it. We had pork, with onions and whole cloves of garlic and it was delicious.

After this we headed to the local bingsu place for some dessert. Patbingsu literally means red beans with ice and is finely shaved ice that is traditionally topped with, you guessed it, my old friend red bean paste! I steadfastly refused to be fooled against by red bean paste and we got one with fresh fruit on top. Unfortunately it was too tasty for me to take any photos as it was eaten inabout five minutes flat!

National Museum National museum atrium

My final day in Korea was spent in the National Museum of Korea. It’s recently moved to Yongsan, on land that used to be part of the US Garrison nearby (fun fact, construction was delayed for years as Seoul’s municipal government and the US Army apparently fought over the location of a helipad) and opened its new doors in 2005. The building itself is spectacular, light and airy, constructed around a central atrium with clever curation that leads you in a logical route around the entire museum in chronological order. Unless, like my friend when he visited, you manage to turn the wrong way at the entrance and so experience Korean history backwards. Apparently it was a unique way to learn about the country! I opted to start in Bronze Age Korea and work my way round to modern Korea. There’s various cafes and tea rooms dotted around on each floor and it took me about three hours to make my way round the main exhibitions – take into account here that I like reading all Iron Buddhathe signs on artefacts! There were also two temporary exhibitions, one on Afghan gold and one on Joseon period printing presses. I’m slightly obsessed with typography and old fashioned printing technology so I spent a good 45 minutes looking at all the printing blocks! One thing that really stood out to me were the iron Buddhas. I’ve not been anywhere in Asia before so I don’t know if this is a uniquely Korean style of devotional art or not but regardless the detail was astonishing.

Mandu

By far and away my favourite food of the trip was mandu (dumplings). I mean, what’s not to love? Tasty filings, boiled or fried dough, food you can eat with your hands? Obviously my last meal in Korea had to be mandu. We hit a local stall in the market for a mystery selection (I’m 99% sure my friend knew what he was ordering) and headed down to the Han to eat. 10 days was not enough time to spend in Korea. There’s so much I still want to see, so much more to learn about the culture and so much food I’ve yet to eat! This trip was a good introduction, dipping my toes into South Korea if you will. Expect more posts in the future when I make another trip. South Korea, I’m not finished with you yet!

Seoul: Disney Castles and Fried Chicken

I’ll be the first to admit, I had no idea what to expect when arriving in Seoul. I’ve become way more chilled out about travelling over the past year and didn’t really do much research about Korea before my trip. So arriving into Seoul and realising how huge a city it was came as a slight surprise. It really shouldn’t, it’s one of the biggest cities in the world, coming in the top 5 in terms of population and metropolitan area. What I wasn’t expecting was how green it was. South Korea in general is a beautifully green country, and it’s something that had surprised me before but I wasn’t expecting it in a huge sprawling city. I’m from England where our cities (think London, Birmingham, Manchester) are beautiful and vibrant and I love them but you could never describe them as natural wonders. They’re all thoroughly industrialised and built up with a few parks dotted throughout. The view from my friend’s apartment in Yongsan was kind of mind-blowing. I know it may seem that I’m overreacting but seriously, check it out. Being right next to the river was awesome and the fact that there’s no buildings along the Han was baffling. Again, think about English cities – you can’t even walk along the Thames for more than half an hour in central London without having to divert around buildings.

View over the Han original

Totally didn’t lean out of 23rd floor window for this shot 

After a super lazy start to the day recovering from Boryeong Mud Festival and eating traditional Parisian patisserie from Gontran Cherrier (who knew, fancy pastries are super popular in Korea) we headed out into Seoul. We were hoping to hit up a beer festival but turns out we’d missed it by a day. One thing I will say about South Korea. It might be one of the most connected places in the world in terms of wifi connectivity but the use of websites to give information about upcoming events is appalling – trying to find out when and where things are happening is a nightmare! We’d headed over to Sinchon, an area known for its nightlife and student population. So obviously we’d gone on a Sunday afternoon. Perfect time to check out some bars.

western-desserts

That classic and well loved advertising duo, Uncle Sam and Mary Poppins 

 

My Korean friend had insisted that while I was in Seoul I had to try Chimaek, Korean fried chicken. It’s one of those brilliant words created by smushing two other words together. You’re supposed to eat it with a beer and so the name is a fusion of ‘chicken’ and ‘maekju’ (Korean for beer). Isn’t language cool? As you’d expect, it’s a perfect combination, slightly
greasy fried chicken and beer being the basis of so many late night purchases around the world. I’m trying to find somewhere that does it back here in the UK (any suggestions welcomed) because it was delicious. As you can probably tell, the food was one of the highlights of Korea for me!

Lotte World

This essential Korean experience ticked off my list, it was time to visit Lotte World. This is a huge complex, made up of the world’s largest indoor amusement park, an outdoor theme park, huge shopping mall, Korean folk museum and hotel amongst other things. The indoor park is open late all year round and what better way to spend a Sunday evening than on teeny tiny rollercoasters?

None of the pictures I took fully convey just how huge it is. You walk in and I actually had to stop to try and take it all in. It is colossal. In the entrance hall you’re greeted by a fully sized ice rink under an atrium style glass ceiling that has a monorail and full sized hot-air balloon ride running around the edge of it. And that’s just the entrance. You go into the park itself and there’s a maze of levels, corridors and stairs to find your way around. There were a lot of couples in matching outfits there, taking adorable (and slightly awkward on the guys part) selfies with their matching totally not Mickey and Minnie mouse ears on. I’d kind of got used to sticking out like a sore thumb with my short red hair and piercings but I felt really out of place in the super cute atmosphere of Lotte World.

It was surreal how much merchandise there was ripped straight from Disney. Maybe Lotte has a franchise deal going but there was everything from Marvel toys, Minnie mouse costumes and even the famous castle from the various Disney Worlds (though no idea if there’s a cryogenically frozen Korean Walt Disney underneath it). A personal favourite was the inside of the castle complete with walls lined with shields and swords as well as a replica war horse and knight, both in full armour.

See why it's called Korean Disney World?

See why it’s called Korean Disney World?

Even though we went later on in the day, the queues to get on the most popular rides were 45 minutes long at their shortest. We really wanted to go on The French Revolution, mainly because of the name to be honest. Who doesn’t want to say they survived that?! Unfortunately the queue for that was surprisingly huge – guess everyone wanted a shot at liberté, égalité and fraternité. We also couldn’t get on the hot-air balloon ride which looked amazing. You got in a basket underneath a giant plastic balloon and were then lifted up to the ceiling of Lotte World before making your way along a track that ran around the entire roof. Obviously the queue for this was over an hour and a half long and I have the attention span of an amnesiac goldfish so wasn’t prepared to wait that long. We did manage to go on an Indiana Jones themed water ride with a Korean family and a very excited small kid. I may have over-played my reaction to the drops and spins of the track somewhat for their benefit.

Lotte world balloonsThe highlight of Lotte World, however, had to be the Haunted House. After wrestling with the ticket machine (the problem when two waegukin go out without a Korean speaking chaperone) we headed in. It was… Disappointing. Not scary. Not dark. We were kind of hurrying through when we heard some loud screaming coming from up ahead. Not a pre-recorded tinny scream but a proper terrified, real-life human scream. Maybe it got scarier the further in you got? Around the next corner we found two Korean girls on the floor, almost crying in terror, hugging each other for support. Standing over them was a guy in a black robe with a pretty unconvincing skull mask on. He was trying to lean down and offer them a hand up but every time he moved, the girls started screaming again. My friend and I were by this point clutching the walls in laughter, watching as he tried again and again to help them. After a good few minutes he gave up and went back into his little cubbyhole in the wall. The girls practically crawled out of the house and the guy came back out with his mask off, shrugging at us. We were still cracking up with laughter, having to hold each other up at this point. Who knew Haunted Houses could be such a source of hilarity?

Banpo Bridge

I talked at the beginning of this post about how green Seoul is and we spent the evening wandering down to Banpo Bridge in the park that runs along the Han River. There was so many people out, cycling, drinking, eating, listening to music. My friend had told me I needed to see Banpo Bridge and had only told me that it was a ‘dancing rainbow fountain bridge’. Now, I’m a creative writer but even I couldn’t quite picture what exactly that meant. Turns out a ‘dancing rainbow fountain bridge’ is a bridge that has horizontal jets set all along its sides, with rainbow coloured LEDs and speakers. The jets move and fire off in time to the music, with a light show going simultaneously. Koreans really love their dancing fountains. Yet another surreal musical experience to add to the list!

fountain-bridge-seoul

Boryeong Mud Festival

Of all the slightly bonkers things I did in South Korea, Boryeong Mud Festival has to be the most surreal. What is a mud festival? It’s exactly what it sounds like. Think Glastonbury but warmer and without the music. The aim is to get as covered in mud as physically possible. I was an outdoorsy kid – growing up on army bases means you always have amazing woods to get lost in. But I was never allowed to wear white. I was a pretty clumsy tree climber and mud and blood make for a lot of laundry. Naturally when I found out we were heading to Mudfest I picked out my whitest, cleanest outfit. I’m a responsible adult now and I’m going to use that power to get as dirty as physically possible.

I expected Mudfest to have some ancient and spiritual history stretching back to before records began. Boryeong Mud Festival has actually, however, only been going since the late 90s. As you’d expect for a country famed for its make-up and cosmetics industry, the festival started out as a marketing vehicle for Boryeong mud cosmetics. Apparently the mud itself has been famous for years for being good for your skin (mine did feel lovely and soft after a day being covered in it!) and for Mudfest they collect huge vats of it from nearby mud flats. These are then transported to the beach where the festival itself takes place.

Our day started out super early in Seoul. Turns out Boryeong is pretty much halfway between Seoul and Mokpo so I was retracing my steps from the week before (check out my adventures in the south of the Korean Peninsula here). On the way we drove over the Seohae Bridge which is over 7000m long. I’m slightly obsessed with bridges and tunnels, I think it comes from being an engineer’s daughter. We also tried these snacks called walnut balls that were walnut shaped cakes filled with red bean paste. I have a love hate relationship with red bean paste. If you’re expecting red bean paste, it’s a quite tasty addition to sweet dishes. If you’re a tired, blurry-eyed European who thinks what they’re eating is Nutella – not so nice. I made this mistake a surprising number of times during my trip.

MudFest 2k16

We arrived in Boryeong at lunch time. The Mud Festival has two breaks a day where they close for people to eat. We took the time to grab some drinks because another grand and venerable tradition of Mudfest is maintaining a steady level of drunkenness. Luckily the weather was kind of perfect – warm but overcast without ever raining. I’d have got supremely sunburn if it’d been better weather as mud isn’t the best sunscreen. We spent the lunch break sat on the beach with a few beers. Soon as Mudfest reopened, we headed in, ready to get mucky.

The first place we found was a big pool where you could go and splash mud at each other but it was disappointingly watery. It only stained rather than destroyed our clothes. Not good enough. After a bit of hunting I found a trough full of good, thick mud. And started a mud fight by throwing a load right in my friend’s face. Pro tip guys – if you wear contacts, come prepared with swim goggles so they don’t get messed up when you inevitably get a face full. Pretty quickly we were all filthy and my childhood dream of ruining a white shirt had been fulfilled. My mother would have been so proud.

 

Mud fest Johnny and I

Good thing someone remembered his GoPro!

 

There were various stalls around the edge of the mud zone (personal favourite was the Foreign Interpretation Assistance Unit – like SWAT for lost, drunk waegukin) and one was doing face painting with coloured mud. After queueing for about 45 minutes we realised we need numbers in order to actually get painted when we reached the front so one of our group dived into another queue while we waited in line. Then when we eventually made it to the front, my friend and I (the guy from the zorbing incident in New Zealand) were told we were too dirty to have mud painted on our faces. Another good idea that I should share here – have someone in your group that actually speaks Korean. Then when you’re frustrated and have no idea why someone won’t paint your face, you don’t have to just rely on increasingly abstract hand signals. Having to clean up meant another queue to wash the mud off our faces. This proved a bit much even for my British love of queueing but eventually we made it to the face painting station. Between the 3 of us there was a cat, an advert for Korea and a superhero. Being a comic book nerd, I was more than happy with this.

being-painted

 

Boryeong

After some ramen and a few more beers we wandered a bit further along the beach and heard some chanting. When we checked it out there was a man climbing a ladder of knives. Yep. You read that right. There was an old man climbing a ladder (more of a staircase really) of knives in time to chanting and drum beats. Then some women dressed all in white carried white globes down to the sea where they floated them away. We couldn’t work out what was going on beyond it being some form of ancestor worship and I still haven’t really got any idea. Any suggestions would be welcomed!

The weather was starting to turn at this point so we headed for showers before we got rained on. In England, unlike the rest of Europe, we’re not really big on communal, public nudity. If you go to a swimming pool in the UK, chances are everyone will keep their swimsuits on to shower afterwards. Go figure, we’re a famously repressed nation. Not in Korea. There was no swimsuits in the showers at Boryeong. Luckily the water was so freezing that it distracted me from my innate British awkwardness.

 

Mud fest colours

One thoroughly destroyed white shirt? Check

 

There was still a while to wait before the main event in the evening so we camped out in a coffee shop. In there with us were some girls who were taking selfies, showing them to their friends and then touching up their make-up to take more selfies. Apparently this is a popular past time in Korea. It was something that struck me while in Korea, and I’m definitely not the first to say it, how image conscious the whole country is. Even at Mudfest there were a lot of girls with full faces of make-up trying to not get dirty.

K-Pop in Korea

Finally it was time for the evening’s entertainment to kick off. What could possibly be better than spending a day throwing mud at your friends? PSY. That’s right, the K-pop star that smashed YouTube records with Gangnam Style back in 2012 and then seemingly disappeared in the UK music scene. He’s still massive in Korea and I had an awesome time listening to some of his big hits. It was one of those moments in life where you just look around you and think “Is this really happening right now?”. Dancing on a South Korean beach to Gangnam Style live just about topped listening to it with Mokpo’s dancing fountain (it’s a close run thing let me tell you).

 

PSY

 

Boryeong Mud Festival was utterly bonkers. I have told everyone who’s asked me about Korea about it. It seems such a uniquely Korean event, even down to its creation coming from the cosmetics industry. If you’re in the Peninsula at the beginning of July, or even anywhere near Korea, definitely check it out. It’s an experience that will stick with you. Even if you have to throw out the clothes you wore. 

Jeonju: Exploring traditional Korea

Jeonju is a city just over 2 hours drive away from Mokpo (check out what I got up to in Mokpo here). It’s famous for its Hanok Village, an area of the city designed to show off traditional Korean culture. Jeonju is also famous for 2 important Korean foods: bibimbap and hangover soup (Kongnamul Gukbap to give it its proper name). My time here was so interesting I’m just going to focus on that for this post.

Hanoks

We stayed at Dukmanjae, a traditional hanok just outside of the Hanok Village. When building a hanok, the position of the house in relation to its surroundings is considered as well as the impact the seasons will have on it. As you’d expect with this much care being taken about where the house is, the inside is also carefully planned, following the principles of baesanimsu. This literally means that ideally a house is built with a mountain in the back and a river in the front. Hanok also have wide front porches for keeping the house cool in the hot and humid Korean summers. Ours had sliding panel doors but some have ones you lift up and hook onto the ceiling of the porch.

Dukmanjae Hanok

 

Haejungguk

After dropping our bags off we headed out into Jeonju to find hangover soup, despite not being remotely hungover. It was a real hot afternoon and it turned out my friend was not the most reliable map reader in the world but eventually we made it to Sambaekjib, home of Kongnamul Gukbap in Jeonju. Kongnamul Gukbap is a hot bean sprout soup with rice and there’s a whole ritual to eating it. You’re given the soup with a fried egg and seaweed on the side which you have to add in a specific order. You can also top up any ingredients you feel you’re running low on, adding rice or vegetables as you need. It’s packed full of carbs, veggies and protein: you can see why it’s a hangover cure!

Hangover soup

Hanok Village

ChurchWe returned to start our sightseeing, heading first to the Jeondong Cathedral (also known as the Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus). I’d known that Christianity was a major religion in Korea but I had been surprised at just how many churches there were everywhere. It was even more surreal seeing a European style cathedral in amongst the hanoks and distinctly Korean buildings. The cathedral was built between 1908 and 1914 to honour Roman Catholic martyrs who had lost their lives during the Joseon period. This was when the Joseon Dynasty ruled Korea, from 1392 until 1897. In October 1897, this kingdom was renamed the Korean Empire (which was made up of what we’d now see as North and South Korea). Joseon Korea was a Confucianist state which led to the persecution and martyring of Catholics in the 19th century. Unfortunately we couldn’t go inside as a service was taking place. Nevertheless, it was still an interesting angle of Korean culture to look at.

Gyeonggijeon Shrine

Our next stop was much more traditionally Korean: Gyeonggijeon Shrine. It was beautiful – my photos don’t really do it justice! I love the colour schemes used on temples and palaces in Korea, the reds and greens with the gold accents on the really important carvings. From a massively nerdy point, I’d been looking forward to seeing palaces and shrines since I’d arrived in Korea. I’m a huge fan of Avatar: The Last Airbender and the Earth Kingdom in the show has some distinctly Korean influences in its design. So getting to see some Joseon period buildings in real life was pretty spectacular.

Archives

It was here that the hanbok craze was clearest. There is a big trend at the moment in Korea for renting hanbok, which are traditional outfits usually reserved for events like New Year. Despite how hot it was, most of the people we saw in Jeonju, both men and women, were wearing hanbok. The women were wearing a mixture of the more traditional silk, full-skirted styles and a modern knee length version in pastel shades with a lot of lacework. Some men were wearing gat (traditional hats) while some women wore ornamental hair pieces. Hanbok simply means ‘Korean clothing’ but has come to mean specifically Joseon period style clothing. There were foreign influences on Hanbok but it was only Mongolian princesses marrying into the Korean royal family after a peace treaty with the Mongol Empire in the 13th century that had any lasting impact.

Given all this historical context, I loved watching people using selfie sticks to take photos of themselves in their Hanbok. This mix of old and new, traditional and technology and the pride in their culture was pretty cool to watch. No way would you get British teenagers putting on Tudor ruffs and doublets to visit the Tower of London! Getting particular attention for selfies were the guys dressed as guards at the palace gates. One was wearing an awful lot of fur for July in Korea and the other had a magnificent hat with huge feathers. We got to watch the guards change over which involved a lot of shouting and ceremonial handing over of swords. Once the excitement of this had died down we headed further into the shrine complex to explore.

One of the things I reaHanbok galorelly liked about Korean architecture was the focus on outdoor space. If you think of traditional English buildings (castles, cathedrals, stately homes) they’re all about the whacking huge construction projects. Korean architecture tends towards a lot of smaller buildings with plenty of peaceful outdoor space. Gyeonggijeon Shrine was built in 1410 to house the portrait King Tae-jo who founded the Joseon Dynasty. This was housed in its own building and there was a separate small museum dedicated to other royal portraits. One of the most interesting pieces for me was a replica of a portrait that is currently in North Korea. As an English tourist, I think it was easy to forget that it’s only recently that these two countries separated. There’s such a huge amount of shared history and culture for what we now see as such disparate places.

Hanbok

My friend decided that the best thing we could do to immerse me in Korean culture was to get me in a Hanbok. But not just any Hanbok: a royal Hanbok. Complete with a collosal hairpiece. The Hanbok was beautiful, red silk with a lot of embroidery. It was also incredibly hot. The hairpiece was extremely heavy and I’m not sure my gingery curly hair really matched it! While I definitely felt very regal, I couldn’t move much at all. I guess if you’re a queen you have people to move for you and you just need to sit, trying not to show that you’re melting.

The Hanbok was enough of a success that my hosts wanted me to try on old fashioned Korean school uniforms, the kind that their parents would have worn when they were younger. This was fairly simple, consisting of a black skirt and a jacket with a white shirt. The issue came with me trying it on. Turns out being average height in the UK translates to being super tall in South Korean sizing. There was also the matter of the armband. While in the UK having a position of responsibility at school usually means getting a tie or a pin, in Korea it’s an armband to be worn over your school jacket. I don’t think it has the same fascist overtones over there as it does here!

 

Bibimbap

Bibimbap

That evening we went to try Jeonju’s most famous food: bibimbap. This is a dish of rice, meat and vegetable with egg, covering all the important food groups. Other than the name, the most fun part of bibimbap is that some versions are served in a hot stone bowl and you mix it really fast to finish cooking it at your table. This was the food I’d been looking forward to eating since I’d arrived and to actually be able to eat it in the place where it came from was awesome.

We followed it up with some grapefruit beer. Now I’m from the UK. We’re pretty serious about beer over here. It’s kind of our thing. So I was expecting some kind of fancy craft beer. Sadly it was just lager with grapefruit syrup in it. And head out of a slushie machine. I’ve drunk enough beer in my life to know that there’s an art to pouring with the minimum amount of head. Otherwise you’re wasting precious space in your pint glass. Not in Korea. Here beer comes in a domed iced coffee cup to make extra space for all that delicious foam. Bonkers.

Dumplings

Our night in the hanok was very peaceful. Again, I’d definitely recommend Dukmanjae as a hanok stay, it was super quiet and the owner was lovely and friendly. We wandered around the market for a bit, and I had fun trying to find a sports bra in my size (top tip – if you think you’ll need sports underwear and you’re more than a C cup in the UK, take it with you!). We went to a dumpling place for lunch that had had a queue out the door the night before. I got to try the heavenly combination of fried dumplings filled with dangmyeon) sweet potato noodles. Seriously, they were what my food dreams are made of.

Dumplings original

These delicious dumplings marked the end of my time in Jeonju and with my South Korean hosts. They’d done an amazing job showing me as much Korean culture as they could in the five days I spent with them. I ate so much delicious food, probably more sea food than I’d eaten in my entire life until that point and to be honest, I’m still not completely sure what everything I ate was!

I fulfilled a long-held wish to eat proper Korean bibimbap and visit a bamboo forest. Now it was time to hop on a train back to Seoul – I caught a slower train this time which took 3 1/2 hours from Jeonju to Seoul but was slightly cheaper at 17,600₩. After some adventures involving failed wifi and Ichon subway station’s 6 exits (seriously, get a Korean phone sim if you’re visiting, it’s so worth it) I managed to meet up with my friend in Seoul. This is where I’ll end this week as the next item on my itinerary was Boryeong Mud Festival. And a day that crazy deserves a whole post to itself.

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